Why is back and neck pain such a big problem?

February 3, 2011

A very common complaint patients with back or neck pain have is that their doctor doesn’t provide them with a clear diagnosis or explanation of their pain.23,79

That complaint is quite understandable because the conventional examination used by most doctors, along with the best imaging procedures available, are unable to identify the precise cause of most back and neck pain. That does not mean there isn’t a cause; it just can’t be found in most cases using those methods of evaluation.

Nevertheless, back and neck pain often go away on their own in a few days or weeks, regardless of what treatment you pursue.21,59,81,82 Therefore, the underlying problem, whatever it is, is somehow often able to recover, even without formal treatment.

Unfortunately, even though it goes away, it often returns a few weeks or months later.21,59,81,82 Each time it returns, it is referred to as a new “episode”. Each episode ends when the pain goes away again for a few more weeks, months, or maybe even years. Unfortunately, it is all too common for back pain to return several times each year and continue to do so for many years.

Many report that, when their pain returns, it’s even worse than before.30,83,84 Perhaps you have had a few episodes.  Is your pain now more intense, more disabling, lasting longer than in your early episodes? Has it now spread into your arm or leg and require more care than in the past? Often, after many episodes, your pain finally just doesn’t recover again. When it persists for three months or more, it is usually referred to as “chronic”. Once symptoms become chronic, the underlying problem is often much more difficult to solve.

Sometimes back or neck pain become so severe that it prevents you from doing things you want and need to do: you can’t work, take care of your home and family, or participate in the fun things in life. If you are just not improving, your doctor may offer a referral to another doctor for spinal injections or to a spine surgeon to consider an operation.

Besides being no fun, these procedures are risky. They are not always successful, may make your pain worse, cause new symptoms, and also limit future treatment choices. In most circumstances, these risks are unlikely, but they are certainly possible. Unfortunately, it is not unusual to end up with long-term, even permanent, disabling pain.

But these procedures can also be helpful for many. But who are they? There is no way to figure that out ahead of time. And unfortunately, even those who improve are often still unable to return to their former level of activity or work.

So are there any better solutions? Yes, thankfully, for most there are.

The above is a chapter excerpted from my book entitled “Solving The Mystery: The Key to Rapid Recoveries for Most Low Back and Neck Pain.”  This book, my first book (“Rapidly Reversible Low Back Pain“), the SelfCare First website, and many posts on this blog are all devoted to spreading the message:  yes, thankfully, there are better solutions.  In fact, most back and neck pain is rapidly reversible using simple-but-specific exercises and posture modifications. Keep reading these resources. (Numbered references in this excerpt cite specific scientific articles listed in this book.)

Dr. Ron

Ronald Donelson, MD, MS
President

SelfCare First, LLC
Blog: blog.selfcarefirst.com

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