Why Should SELF-CARE Always Be Explored FIRST?

February 23, 2011

Musculoskeletal (MS) conditions account for the majority of lost work and bed days due to health conditions. According to a report by the Bone & Joint Decade commission, they are the leading cause of disability and health care cost, as well as the most common health condition in the U.S.  The total U.S. cost of MS treatment and lost-wages in 2004 was estimated to be $849 Billion, or 7.7% of GDP.

In this large and very expensive MS arena, numerous studies show that many disorders can be resolved quite easily and quickly using some simple-yet-precise movements and positions of the painful joints that somehow actually correct the underlying problem and eliminate the pain.  The really good news is that, if you’re the one in pain, you can usually perform these movements and positions yourself.  But this requires your provider to first determine which movements, if any, will correct the problem and then teach you what to do.  This specific form of self-care, known as Mechanical Diagnosis & Therapy (MDT), empowers you to take control of, and eliminate, your own painful problem.

Unfortunately, these painful conditions are rarely treated in this way. Only a small percentage of individuals with MS conditions are provided the opportunity to be evaluated by a clinician with MDT training. Consequently, the painful conditions too often persist, even worsen, despite undergoing other extensive, expensive, sometimes even risky treatments. But most importantly, these treatments are all unnecessary for those who can recover using self-care first and MDT principles.

I wanted to advocate for this first type of MDT self-care across the spine care community in order to help individuals avoid these other ineffective and expensive treatments. I therefore founded Self-Care First in 2002. This blog is part of that effort. So whether your condition can be eliminated easily with MDT care or not, the best way to find out is to be evaluated by a practitioner trained in MDT.  In other words, first explore the potential and value of self-care.  Therefore…..self-care first.

Exploring self-care first is especially important in the many disorders that do recover, only to recur days, weeks, or months later. Low back and neck pain are common examples of conditions that frequently recur. Many treatments for these conditions are described as “passive”. That means your practitioner performs the treatment on your behalf, doing something TO you.  They may apply ice, heat, ultrasound, or diathermy to your painful area, or use their hands to massage, mobilize or manipulate your spine and other joints. But they are performing the treatment for you.  You are passive.

Even if effective in decreasing your pain, the pain usually returns again soon.  When it does, your experience tells you to return to get that same relief again for that same passive treatment from your practitioner.  So you seek that type of care again, and again, and again, that cycle repeating itself sometimes many times.  But you meanwhile learn nothing about how to treat yourself or how to prevent your own pain from returning.  You instead develop a dependence on your provider and this passive care while gaining no insight into why it keeps returning nor how to prevent it.  Some practitioners will deepen your dependency on them by recommending you return for treatment even after your pain has gone away in order to prevent your painful condition from returning.  But no data has ever shown that such treatment lowers the chance of having another episode.

Alternatively, if you had learned methods of self-care first that enabled you to eliminate your own pain, you would have also learned how to prevent your pain from returning, a necessary part of your recovery from your current episode as well as for preventing it over the weeks and months ahead.  And if or when your pain does return, you already know how to get rid of it by yourself, because what worked before usually works just as well now.  You have been empowered to be independent of your practitioner using the know-how learned earlier to quickly and effectively treat yourself.

There’s one other point that illustrates the importance of pursuing self-care first (MDT care).   In other blog postings, I described studies documenting that as many as 50% of individuals with back pain that had been considered disc surgery candidates, when finally provided this MDT evaluation, found out they had a rapidly and easily reversible problem all this time that would quickly resolve using self-care.  This enabled these individuals to avoid what would have been unnecessary surgery.

The overwhelming message for patients, clinicians, employers and health plans is to pursue MDT and self-care first.  To locate a practitioner near you that is trained to provide you with this form of care, click here.

Here are some books you may wish to read about MDT and self-care for low back, neck, and shoulder pain:

Treat Your Own Back, by Robin McKenzie

Treat Your Own Neck, by Robin McKenzie

Treat Your Own Shoulder, by  Robin McKenzie

Solving the Mystery: The Key to Rapid Recoveries from Most Back and Neck Pain, by Ronald Donelson

Rapidly Reversible Low Back Pain: An Evidence-Based Pathway to Widespread Recoveries and Savings, by Ronald Donelson

Dr. Ron

Ronald Donelson, MD, MS
President

SelfCare First, LLC
Blog: blog.selfcarefirst.com

One Response to “Why Should SELF-CARE Always Be Explored FIRST?”


  1. […] patients who so easily learn to effectively self-treat are then empowered to become independent of health care providers, both in their recovery from […]


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: